Family, Memoirs.

Doctor Dad . . . Irreplaceable

My Dad, Tony Wiebe, retired as a family physician nearly twelve years ago, in 2000. He was my personal physician for most of his practice, as well as my family.

During the course of his forty two years of practice, he had always taken care of family members, immediate and extended, with the greatest generosity. Dad was always available for family, 24 x 7, and family members were never charged for his services. He would get up at any time of the night and go to someone's house or meet them at his clinic when he received a call for help, whether from within his household or via the telephone.

Family, Observations.

Grandbabies!

The birth of a new child in the family never gets old, even if it occurs a thousand miles away! My niece Janna and her husband Jerome recently had a baby, Deacan. Not long before Deacan was born, Matt and Katie Stewart had a baby, Miriam, the first grandchild of my old friends Tim and Laurie. And penultimate addition to the Wiebe family, Sophia, remains a source of regular, albeit once removed delight, thanks to Facebook.
Family, History, Memoirs.

Oregon loves New York: memories of 9/11

My wife Cindy and I awoke early on September 11, 2001 in Portland, Oregon. As I was preparing for work, she called me to the television, which had the smoking image of the first of the burning World Trade towers. We both stared in disbelief, and watched numbly as that terrible day unfolded, as the second tower was struck, as people began to jump from the buildings, after which one building and then the other crashed to the ground, so rapidly as to seem completely unreal. We watched as the Pentagon was struck, and followed the tense and fragmentary reporting as planes were grounded, fighter planes were scrambled, and frantic searches were being conducted to account for all of the airplanes in the air, culminating in the crash of flight 93 in a Pennsylvania field.  We wondered what could possibly motivate someone to cause such horrific damage, to deliberately destroy so many innocent lives.
Family, Memoirs.

Chess tournament etiquette: Performance art?

Several chess writers have mentioned a German 'book' entitled Instructions to Spectators at Chess Tournaments, which was comprised of three hundred blank pages followed by the phrase "Shut Up!"

This piece of performance art (the performer is the reader of the book) brought to mind an experience my son Jon and I shared years ago at a chess tournament.  Jon had an early interest in chess, and starting in the fourth grade, played in multiple chess tournaments, the only member of the Wiebe family to compete in chess, even if only for a few years.  I took him to his last tournament, and joined the ranks of fussy parents watching their children anxiously from the sidelines.  In his second game, after perhaps ten moves, I noticed that Jon had just placed his opponent in a discovered check situation.  I was excited for him, because discovered check can be a lethal tactic . . .

Family, Healthcare, Observations.

Resident physicians: Too tired, or what?

Residents, or resident physicians, are young physicians who are completing their training by working, under the supervision of other physicians, very long hours for several years in a teaching hospital.  Concern is routinely raised regarding being treated by physicians who are still learning, and might be exhausted and perhaps making poor judgments.  Two current medical residents debate the issue.