History, Reviews.

The smartest Nazi

Albert Speer, Hitler's personal architect and Reich Armaments Minister, kept a diary while he was in Spandau prison following his conviction at the post-war Nuremburg trials. These diaries provide a fascinating, hooded glimpse of the 'smartest man' in the Nazi leadership. At least, smart enough to evade the death penalty at the Nuremberg Trials ...
Observations.

Is the Lost Cause finally getting lost?

In a response to the recent furor over the Confederate flag and its removal from public grounds, Kevin Drum just nails it:

Are we still arguing about whether the Civil War was really fought over slavery? Seriously? What's next? The Holocaust was really about Jews overstaying their tourist visas? The Inquisition was a scientific exploration of the limits of the human body? The Romans were genuinely curious about whether a man could kill a hungry lion? The Bataan death march was a controlled trial of different brands of army boots?
(Kevin Drum, Are We Still Yammering About Whether the Civil War Was About Slavery? Really?, Mother Jones
Essays, Science.

The moons of Jupiter

The fascination of astronomy for me, beyond the beauty of the heavens in the night sky, beyond the immense imponderables of the current model of a vast and ancient universe, is the idea that our understanding regarding the universe has been gleaned by observing from the Earth a few points of light in the sky. One illustration of this can be found in the history of our knowledge of the moons of Jupiter.
Education, Science.

Evolutionary zinger: The bat, the moth, and the mite

When Fred Rickson taught his section of General Biology at Oregon State, I made sure to attend all of his lectures, as he opened them with his evolutionary zingers, hoping that his students would would be enticed to be more prompt than usual.  My favorite was his zinger about the three-way symbiotic relationship between a bat, a moth, and a mite.